Things You Really Want To Avoid Saying When Around A Recovering Addict

March 3, 2016

It is very normal that when you find your loved one addicted to drugs, your emotions changes with every passing day. Some days you may feel sad and helpless, while some days frustrated and angry. These mix emotions lead you to say things you don’t really mean. On the other hand, whatever you say to an addict in the recovering phase makes a lot of different on his/her progress.

Therefore, it is crucial to understand the situation well and speak on encouraging and motivating words. Also, it is very important to avoid saying embarrassing, cruel and dismissive things to an addict, since such things can take their condition from bad to worst. In well-known rehab centers like the Apex Rehab center, due care is taken that addicts only get to hear motivational and helpful things, in order to make sure they recover faster and with ease.

Things You Really Want To Avoid Saying When Around A Recovering Addict

Top 6 things you must never say to an addict:

  • “You Are Worthless.”

Most addicts are constantly fighting with themselves, and in such a situation the last thing they want to here are they being worthless. The moment they hear this, they will start believing that they are truly worthless and you yourself know it isn’t true.

You are trying hard to make them sober, and so instead of saying something so hurtful, try to convince them that they are worth a good life and a bright future. Also, constantly remind them how much important they are to you.

  • “Once an Addict, Always an Addict.”

Seriously this is the last thing you should be saying to a recovering addict. You want to make them understand that yes they can get out of this and not make them feel that all this is a waste and in the end he/she will always remain an addict. Take your time to figure out what you want to say and what not. You can even chose to me quiet at times.

  • “You Are Ruining Your and My Life. . .”

Usually such words come out of frustration and you don’t feel truly the same. After all you are working hard on your loved one’s recovery and want to make sure they make it. So, you can be supportive and calm with them, instead of making them count your issues and also your struggling situation.

  • “Are You Sure You Can Do It?”

Addicts struggle a lot to become sober again, and once they are, the last thing they want to know is you don’t trust them. Well, even if you are questioning their actions out of concern, never make them feel like they are not in a state to take their own decisions.

  • “So and so did it in no time”

Well, just like any other person, even addicts don’t like to be compared with others recovering. Remember, the feeling of addiction is different from person to person. So, when you narrate someone’s example in front of an addict, you are just implying that they are weak enough to not to do it.