Immigration Tips When Entering The United Kingdom

May 24, 2016

Entering the United Kingdom can be a very stressful situation for many people, and during the interview process, a lot of people struggle to get their words out and their point across. This doesn’t mean that the person has done anything wrong or is doing anything wrong in their attempts to enter the UK, but a bad performance at the interview process can have a negative impact on someone’s application.

This is why there is a need for people to study and prepare themselves for an interview, and these are some dependable immigration tips when entering the United Kingdom.

Be Confident and Positive

When you are dealing with a visa consulate officer it is important to be confident and positive. This is something that many people can turn on and off but for most people, the best way to feel confident and positive is to be as fully prepared as you can. This means that you should study what you are likely to be asked, you should prepare the answers that state your case in the most effective manner and you should look to provide reasons to back up your argument.

Anyone who is leaving a current job in the hope of finding a new job and life in the UK should aim to talk about the enhanced career prospects and what they can bring to a new role. Clearly there are reasons why a person would walk away from one job in one country to find a new job in a different country, but the reasons don’t have to be negative ones. It is far better to focus on the positive aspect of why you are taking up a new position and looking to move forward in your career and life.

Immigration Tips When Entering The United Kingdom

Outline the Reasons why you are Leaving your Native Country

There is nothing to be gained from shying away from the fact that you are leaving your native country to come to the UK. This isn’t something that should be decided on a whim so it is likely that people will have thought about this move and then decided that it is the best thing for their needs. This is what you should aim to get across during your interview.

Before you enter the interview, you should have created a list of reasons why you are looking to leave the country and what you think you’ll gain from making this move.

There is also a lot to be said for explaining the reasons why the UK should let you in to the country. You should be keen to list your skills, your qualities and what you’ll bring to the role and the nation. Too many people view immigration as a one-way thing where the person entering the country is the party that gains everything.

This certainly isn’t the case though and the history of Great Britain is littered with stories and examples of immigrants being of benefit to the nation. You may not be looking to come in and transform the country or create something new, but you should be able to offer something that isn’t available from other people.

Provide References

You should look to provide two references that the interview and their team can contact. This means you want to find people of power, and people of relevancy, in the place of work you are leaving. There is a great deal to be said for receiving a positive review or recommendation from your previous employers, and this can go a long way.

Other tips to bear in mind include:

  • Try to answer questions as clearly as possible
  • Dress formally and smile
  • Be honest
  • Look to show that you have financial dependence

When it comes to feeling confident about the United Kingdom, getting as much support or assistance as possible will go a long way to helping you receive the visa you need. There is a great deal to be said for calling on the services of an immigration solicitor, and this is a brilliant way to ensure you are properly prepared for any interview.

Being nervous or concerned before an interview is perfectly understandable but considering what is at stake, it is vital that you feel as composed and as prepared as possible for an immigration interview.

Andrew Reilly is a freelance writer with a focus on news stories and consumer interest articles. He has been writing professionally for 9 years but has been writing for as long as he can care to remember. When Andrew isn’t sat behind a laptop or researching a story, he will be found watching a gig or a game of football.